Final Project Update!

Problems with education in America

Lack of Parental Involvement 

Epstein (2008) comments on 

this fact when she says,  

 

Educators at all school levels know that successful students—at all ability 

levels—have families who stay informed and involved in their children’s 

education. Yet many middle level and high school teachers report that the 

only time they contact families is when students are in trouble. (p. 9)  

asked about your grades and homework every day when you got home. 

There is no doubt about the importance of parental involvement. Elish-Piper 

(2008) makes the following point in her article:  

 

When parents are involved in education, teens typically have higher grade 

point averages, higher test scores on standardized and classroom 

assessments, enrollment in more rigorous academic courses, more classes 

passed, more credits earned toward graduation, and higher graduation 

rates. (p. 44) 

 

With statistics such as these, we as teachers must do everything in our power to 

get parents involved. One way to go about this is by first finding out why the parents may 

not be involved already. Padgett (2006) cites reasons such as scheduling conflicts, lack of 

transportation, language barriers, and cultural differences as reasons many parents are 

hesitant to get involved with their child’s school. 

 

http://www.saratogafalcon.org/content/us-education-falling-behind-those-other-countries

 

STATS of other countries + ours

In math, AMerican students ranked 31st amoung 65 countries and below the average of countries in the organization for Economic copperation and Development. In science, American students ranked 23rd, on par with the OECD average. American 15-year-olds fared similarly on the 2006 PISA tests: 32 in math and 23rd in science.

 

On the 2009 PISA tests, students in Shanghai, China, ranked no. 1 in both math and sciences, topping No. 2 Singapore in math and No. 2 Finland in science. 

—Handout -”American kids score C in Math, Science”

 

Its declining high school graduation rate, now estimated at around 70%

 

compared with more than 70 economies worldwide, America’s high school students continue to rank only average in reading and science, and below average in math, But this sorry record for a wealthy nation can be broken if the us focuses on recruiting and keeping first-rate teachers.

 

ALmost half of it’s K-12 teachers come from the bottom third of college classes. Classroom leaders such as Singapore, south Korea, and Finand select from the top ranks. In Finland, only 1 in 10 applicants is accepted into teacher training. (The christian Science Monitor- US education Reform)

 

In Finland, teachers earn only about what their American counterparts do (39,000 starting) the differnce is that in Finland, teaching is a high-status, well respected job, right up there with doctoring and lawyering.

 

  1. S. students were doing when the Program on International Student Assessment (PISA) released its study of math achievement for 2006.  U. S. 15-year-olds came in 35th among the 57 nations who participated in its administration. The U. S. average score was 474 points (against an average of 500 for students in the industrialized countries that have been accepted as members of the Organizations of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), http://educationnext.org/compared-to-other-countries-does-the-united-states-really-do-that-badly-in-math/

But educators were encouraged in December 2008 when another respected international survey, Trends in Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), released results from its math testing for 2007.  It found U. S. 8th graders to be ranked Number 9 among the 48 participating countries, and its score, at 508, was above the average for all students from participating countries.  Furthermore, there are those such as Tom Loveless at the Brookings Institution, who has claimed that TIMSS does a better job of measuring math knowledge than PISA does. (Mark Schneider took a close look at both tests in this 2009 article for Education Next.) http://educationnext.org/compared-to-other-countries-does-the-united-states-really-do-that-badly-in-math/

 

A 2006 OECD study found that the U.S. spends more per student across the primary , secondary, and tertiary levels than the 29 other developed countries it studied. $13,447 per student in 2006.

Since 2006, ..the recession has strapped education budgets at the U.S. state and local levels. In part to offset those cuts, the federal govt is ouring even more money into education. The 2011 budget president Obama proposed february included a 40% funding increase for STEM education as well as plan to eventually double funding for key science agencies. 

 

In Finland, teachers earn only about what their American counterparts do (39,000 starting) the differnce is that in Finland, teaching is a high-status, well respected job, right up there with doctoring and lawyering.

 —————————-
FINLAND (cond)

one in three Finnish students receives help from a tutor.

 

http://educationoutrage.blogspot.com/2008/08/wrong-problem-wrong-solution-re-posted.html

ALmost half of it’s K-12 teachers come from the bottom third of college classes. Classroom leaders such as Singapore, south Korea, and Finand select from the top ranks. In Finland, only 1 in 10 applicants is accepted into teacher training. (The christian Science Monitor- US education Reform)

 

In Finland, teachers earn only about what their American counterparts do (39,000 starting) the differnce is that in Finland, teaching is a high-status, well respected job, right up there with doctoring and lawyering.

————————

There was a time in this country when a woman who was valedictorian of her class was almost definitely going to teacher’s college, while her male counterparts went off to law, business or medical school. Since women have won more equality, an unanticipated side-effect to that otherwise healthy reform has been less of our brightest high school students going into teaching and more of them going into boardrooms, becoming surgeons and joining law practices where they can earn much more. http://www.thebradentontimes.com/news/2011/03/24/opinion/florida_merit_pay_battle_might_spark_needed_debate_on_educational_system/

———————-

Obama says…

“we can no longer afford an academic calendar designed for when America was a nation of farmers who needed their children at home ploughing the land at the end of each day.” America needs to ‘buck up it’s act, if it want to remain the most powerful and influential country in the world, by ensuring the education of its future generation.  http://www.saratogafalcon.org/content/us-education-falling-behind-those-other-countries

———————–

Merit Pay – determine teacher’s salary

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